This Shouldn’t Be a Status Meeting … Improving the Daily Scrum

Posted: February 7, 2014 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

How can I keep the daily scrum from becoming a daily status meeting? But if we are all answering three questions then who is supposed to be asking the questions?  If we are gathering to give our updates on these three questions every day on what we are doing then that sounds like a status meeting to me – what am I doing wrong?

These are all questions that I have heard new scrum masters ask.  The daily scrum seems like it should be the simplest thing we do, right?  The team self organizes daily for a time box of no more than 15 minutes and talks about three things:  What I did yesterday, what I am going to do today, and what is standing in my way.

So, why is it so hard?  In my experience … mindset.  Often, scrum masters learn a process to implement but they don’t recognize the mindset that must change in order for the process to have any value.  Being self organizing and collaborative, like being agile, is a mindset.  It’s not just something you do – it’s something you are.  It’s something you become.  It’s about individuals and interactions over process and tools. What I’m finding is that when teams are struggling with the daily scrum it’s about them putting the process and tools over the individuals and interactions.

When I encounter the struggling scrum masters I find that they have been given a process that they are trying to implement:  Meet for 15 minutes, everyone on the team answer three questions about what they are doing, don’t talk about anything else, break ~ scrum master you are responsible for making sure that the process is followed and that the team understands how scrum works so go make it happen.

But the thing they seem to miss in the equation is that the daily scrum is about the team coming together daily to collaborate and plan how they will work together to deliver the highest priority user stories today or as soon as possible.

Are you struggling in this very thing?

What would happen on your team today if instead of everyone taking a turn answering three questions about what they did on some random user story yesterday and will do today towards the sprint goal, you would all look at the scrum board together and focus on only the top priority one or two stories?  Then, collaborate and discuss what you can do as a team to get those stories completed today or tomorrow?

Tomorrow you can do the same only start by adding to the conversation any progress you made since the last time you met or what stopped you from making the progress you each thought you would make.  Then figure out together what you will do as a team to remove those roadblocks and how you will get the remaining work on the story completed before the next daily scrum.

If one or more of the stories gets finished by tomorrow’s daily scrum celebrate that success and add the next priority story to the conversation.

The advice and method I’ve just described is really nothing new, it’s just putting the individuals and interactions over the process and tools.  It’s all about what we focus on.  When we focus on the questions and the time box and governing the scope of the conversation to make sure we don’t deviate from the questions we lose the collaboration and the true heart of what the daily scrum should be.

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